Time to get 3D!

First there was the tape on the floor. I had to physically be in the space to have any idea of how to design the space. Once I felt like I had a grasp on the design I transferred everything over to grid paper and worked out the dimensions.

Final step – a 3D model!

3Dgingershack1As strange as this may sound this was the first time I realized how incredibly small my space is going to be. Once all the walls became real and had to attach to each other there was a ridiculously large closet on the main floor and an insanely big wood burning stove. I have taken a foot off the closest and have moved from the Grand Cook Stove to a much smaller wood burning stove.

3Dgingershack33Dgingershack2View from the top … and space for Tigger!

3Dgingershack4Next step – will it stand the test of an architect/carpenter’s input…..

The heart of the home

grand cook stoveI have had a lot of romantic day dreams about cooking in my new home. Thanks to some amazing Amish design I think they are about to come true.

Meet the heart of my home – The Grand Cook Stove.

6 loaves of bread, a tasty birthday cake or simple stir fry … sky is the limit!

 

Things for the Ginger Shack

things for GSMy dad was just in town for a visit. We started to talk about the actual building of the Ginger Shack. I realized that the only thing I had planned lately was my salt and pepper shakers. I have been stuck in the design/decorating part of this project. No surprise as that is my comfort zone/knowledge base. I have made a promise to myself that 2 times a month (or more if needed) I will be in a Home Depot, Home building, Fireplace type store.

My dad will be back in town for the first two weeks of August to help me build it. Meet the first of my family I have recruited. 3 more to go.

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Just Broken In – Lessons Learnt

As 2014 comes to a close most of us are sitting back and taking stock of the year that just passed. When I look back on the past year, I smile at all of the things I thought I was going to accomplish but I am also amazed at what I did get done on my land. So what did I learn?

1/ The hanging of the sign. I actually bought a fence post for this sign. My friend, Judy, looked at me like I was crazy and said … You know you have a lot of trees. Why did you buy a dead one? Lesson learnt – I have a lot of supplies on my land.

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2/ The deck. Working outdoors is nothing like working indoors, not even close. Lesson learnt – I am out of my element and need to slow down, do research and make way more informed decisions because if I don’t this will not work.

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3/ The camp location. I put the tent on the most level spot of land that was closest to the driveway. We did not look up and ended up building right under a widow maker tree (a tree that is dangerously close to falling).  I also put it at the bottom of my hill and am about to experience my first spring melt so it may or may not be flooded out. The ground is basically years of decaying organic matter so after a few months of heavy equipment being used I now open my door onto a mud pit. Lesson learnt – look at all angles before making a decision.

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4/  The wood burning stove. It came with wire netting for the top of the chimney to keep debris out. This is a great idea for short amount of time but in my case the wire netting is pointless. Rain turns a stove into a small dirty tub but add a new metal T top and all is well. Leason learnt – this is not a vacation this is about to be an all element lifestyle.

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5/ The canvas tent and wood burning stove. Making sure that everything is clear of stove inside the tent is great but making sure everything is clear of the stove pipe is also a good idea. Leason learnt – metal gets really hot and dry leaves burn really nicely.

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6/ Mice. I have successfully build the best home a mouse family could ever hope for. I had no idea that there were so many mice out there. Lesson learnt – you are living outdoors and there is a lot of outdoors you don’t know about coming from the city.

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7/ Black flies. Back in July when we went up to survey for the driveway I had my first ever Black Fly experience. I grew up in a province full of mosquitoes but not black flies. Lesson learnt – Black Flies love my blood.

black fly neck

8/ Winter. I actually thought that I could leave the tent up all year without any worries. Then my neighbours and I talked about the weight of snow. Thankfully, this winter has been very kind to us and as of today the tent has yet to collapse. Leason learnt – this is not a vacation this is about to be an all element lifestyle and you are living outdoors and there is a lot of outdoors you don’t know about coming from the city. (Reoccurring theme)

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9/ I have really amazing neighbours and awesome friends. Thank you all for your support either up there working or simply telling me that this is beautiful and that following your heart is the best thing anyone can do.

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Just Broken In – The Tent

I began looking at yurts online and discovered that they are really expensive. Thankfully, I stumbled upon a great Canadian company called Deluxe Wall Tents and bought myself the most beautiful 168 square foot glamping tent out there! I added on the wood burning stove and upgraded to their deluxe model so mine is equipped with a front and back door as well as two windows. If you like the look and size of my tent it is 12 x 14 x 5 wall x 8.5 peak.  jbi-bday19Everything in the tent (except the bed, pillows, sheets and duvet cover) is second hand or donated by my neighbours. I like the look of objects with a story worn into them plus I am super clumsy so it hurts less when you add a nick to something that already has a few.

jbi-bday22View from the front door

jbi-bday12Check out this company – Cordaroys. The bed is super comfy!

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My closet area and indoor toilet in case of emergencies (ie bear outside your door)jbi-bday14

Kitchen area/dining room/work table.

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My nightstand is all about my family.jbi-bday27

The stove area which at that point was yet to be assembled. It had to be cooked for about 5 hours. Cooking a stove involves getting a huge fire going inside of it to burn off the fumes and seal in the paint. This was done the following weekend with some friend.

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The tent total cost: $2600.00

Everything in the tent: $700.00 (roughly) with the bed being the biggest purchase.

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